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Welcome to the
CommBank
Entrepreneurs
Hub.

The exclusive resource for entrepreneurs.

Episode 10:
Samuel Yeats serves up.

Ultra Serve CEO and founder, Samuel Yeats, was 16 when he began his entrepreneurial journey.

Individualist
Samuel Yeats
is an
Innovator
Innovator

What kind of entrepreneur are you? Take our test to discover your unique entrepreneurial make up.

Take the test

Entrepreneur

James Tuckermann 

James Tuckerman is an entrepreneur, angel investor, professional speaker, and Editor-In-Chief at Anthill Magazine. He is best known for launching Anthill Magazine in 2003. In 2009, he reinvented the business model towards 100% digital production. In 2004 and 2005, he was named Best Small Publisher in Australia by ABA (now Publishers Australia). He founded the 30under30 among other programs and initiatives designed to support entrepreneurs in Australia.

Did you find your
‘inner entrepreneur’
early in life?
By James Tuckermann 

Samuel Yeats discovered his passion for entrepreneurship as a teenager.

In his own words, his biggest break came after the failure of a large Australian telco. Young Samuel, during his lunch breaks at school, jumped on the phone and negotiated the purchase of the telco’s client list. Surprisingly, Samuel’s story is not that unique. Richard Branson tells a similar tale, booking large advertising deals for his student magazine during school recess. And, almost every entrepreneur you’ve ever met is easily qualified to dash off a story or two about early entrepreneurial chutzpah.

This compels me to pose the question, are teenagers natural entrepreneurs? Let’s look at the characteristics that we’ve explored so far in this series.

Teenagers are impatient.

Samuel sat down his parents to explain his ambitions. He clearly remembers making the claim, “I’ve gotta get in now or I’ll be too late.” In fact, he convinced them to let him leave school!

The power of impatience and being ‘unreasonable’ was something that typified the experiences of Arron Wood. It clearly is a natural trait of the average teenager and also the entrepreneur.

Teenagers follow their instincts and challenge authority.

Fortunately for Samuel, his parents were "extremely supportive, and encouraged me to follow my passions." If only more parents adopted a mindset like Samuel's! Samuel also advises that other business builders should take on the experiences of others “but always trust your gut… Do what you feel is right. Not what you’re being told.” This is a sentiment also shared by others in this series. Ronnie Khan is driven by passion and a desire to see positive change that you couldn’t dent with a sledgehammer.

That sounds like teenager speak, right? The entire teen experience is about challenging authority and making attempts to discover the world on our own.

Teenagers rise to challenges.

Samuel is also driven by the need to solve problems. This is gamification theory 101.

What’s gamification or game-layer theory? Well, the same techniques that computer game manufacturers have used to win and hold the attention of teenagers and other game players for decades are now being researched, unpacked and applied to other commercial ventures.

Gamification techniques strive to harness people's natural desires for competition, achievement, status, self-expression, altruism, and closure. In other words, when we are faced by challenges that we feel we can solve, we feel an irrepressible urge to embark on that challenge. And we won’t stop until we feel closure. There’s a stereotype that teenagers are lazy. Yet, these are desires that teenagers feel deeply. And so do entrepreneurs, it seems.

Teenagers are risk takers.

Was it a risk for Samuel to leave school? Not in his eyes. Like most entrepreneurs, Samuel can understand the distinction between a real risk and a perceived risk.

So, are teenagers risk-takers? Ask the parent of any teenager and you’ll receive a straight faced nod, perhaps coupled with a nervous twitch of the eye. But, we fail to give them the credit they deserve.

Without the sometimes harrowing lessons of life, they are better able to discern the difference between a real risk and a perceived risk… a lot like entrepreneurs, right? And, most importantly of all, teenagers (like entrepreneurs) take time out to have fun! Almost every entrepreneur profiled in this series has a way to wind down and cut loose, from water polo to surfing. Being an entrepreneur, like being a teenager, is a world of contradictions.

So, what kind of entrepreneur are you?

James Tuckermann 

Entrepreneur

James Tuckerman is an entrepreneur, angel investor, professional speaker, and Editor-In-Chief at Anthill Magazine. He is best known for launching Anthill Magazine in 2003. In 2009, he reinvented the business model towards 100% digital production. In 2004 and 2005, he was named Best Small Publisher in Australia by ABA (now Publishers Australia). He founded the 30under30 among other programs and initiatives designed to support entrepreneurs in Australia.

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